Attraction

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Red Fort

Home to Mughal Emperors for nearly 200 years, the Red Fort or Lal Kila was converted to barracks for the British colonial army. The iconic landmark recognized by its red sandstone architecture has a rich set of stories dating back to India's pre-independence era. This massive time-tested fortress today is the backdrop for large scale national events such as the Republic Day and Independence Day.

India Gate

Rising 42 mts high in one end of Rajpat stands the India Gate – a symbol of pride and bravery. This outstanding stone archway instantly ignites a feeling of patriotism and thus is a major tourist place in Delhi. Also known by the name of All India War Memorial, this prestigious monument is a mark of respect to all those unknown soldiers who have sacrificed their lives protecting an entire nation.

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Akshardham Temple

Heralded by the Guinness World Record as the World’s Largest Comprehensive Hindu Temple, Swaminarayan Akshardham in New Delhi is an epitome of Indian culture. Akshardham is nothing short of an unforgettable experience taking every visitor close to the breathtaking beauty and grandeur of India’s ancient art, architecture, and eternal spiritual teachings. Various exhibitions on display take visitors through multiple journeys such as the Hall of Values, giant screen film on Discover India, and Cultural Boat Ride. Other attractions include the Circle of Life Musical Fountain (after sunset), Gardens of India, and Lotus Garden.

Qutab Minar

Qutub Minar, a soaring 73 m high tower of victory built in 1193 is one of the finest monuments in the world. An architecture reminiscent of the distinct styles from the Tughlak and Aibak dynasties that ruled Delhi stands sculptured with red sandstone in the first three storeys while the fourth and fifth are made of marble and sandstone. Visit Quwwat-ul-Islam Mosque and make your wishes come true by circling your hands around a 7m high iron pillar enclosed within it.

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Jantar Mantar

Among most popular places to visit in Delhi is the Jantar Mantar, an ancient observatory built by Maharaja Jaisingh of Udaipur in 1794 on the main Parliament Street at Connaught Place. The instruments at Jantar Mantar are undoubtedly fascinating for their ingenuity however the high-rise buildings around have obstructed accurate observations.

Jama Masjid

India's largest mosque, Jama Masijd a sight to behold is definitely among the places to visit in Delhi. The magnum opus mosque constructed by Mughal ruler Shah Jahan stands tall at 40 ft with 4 angles, 2 minarets and can contain 25,000 devotees. The mosque's eye catching exterior made of red sandstone strips and marble is incredible. Marvel the view from the Southern minaret as one gets to see New Delhi's landmark buildings – the Jama Masjid, Connaught Place and Sansad Bhavan (Parliament House) in a direct line.

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Raj Ghat

Serving as the final resting ground for many of India’s greatest heroes, Delhi is also home to Raj Ghat. The black marble platform marking the spot where Mahatma Gandhi, the Father of the Nation, was cremated after his assassination in 1948 still shakes up feelings of patriotism and gratitude in every Indian’s heart. Surrounded by a beautiful park with labeled trees planted by like Queen Elizabeth II, USA President Eisenhower, Ho Chi Minh and various others adds serenity to the memorial. Two museums dedicated to the memorials of Gandhiji, Rajiv Gandhi (Veera Bhoomi), Indira Gandhi (Shakti Sthal), Jawaharlal Nehru (Shanti Vana) and Lal Bahadur Shastri (Vijay Ghat) are also present in the vicinity.

Humayun's Tomb

omb garden has beautiful garden squares with pathways, water channels, and is also a resting ground for Mughal rulers. It was from here that the last Mughal Emperor Bahadur Shah Jafar was captured by the British in 1857.

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Agrasen ki Baoli

Recognised as a protected monument by the Archaeological Survey of India, AgrasenkiBaoli (The well of Agrasen) is truly a fine example of architecture. Combined with the ingenuity of the construction and preciseness by the masters of yore, the step well temple structure will surely fill you wonder and amazement as soon as you visit this legendary tourist place in Delhi. While no one knows the origins of this step well structure, it is widely believed that is was constructed by the King Ugrasen during the Mahabharata Era. The well, which is amongst the few of its kind in Delhi consists of 103 steps, few of which are immersed in water. The top 3 levels of the well are visible and each of them is lined with arched niches on either sides.

Bahai (Lotus) Temple

The ever-popular lotus-shaped Bahai Temple in Delhi is the last of the seven major Bahai temples around the world. A mesmerizing structure made of pure white marble, standing against a lush green landscape, the lotus depicts a symbol common to all religions. Hence the doors of the temple remain wide open for adherents of any faith to pray and meditate. Around the blooming petals lie nine pools of water, which illuminate in natural light.

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